People live in peace with each other, but underneath, it’s boiling

Joseph Sebarenzi talks about his new book, God Sleeps in Rwanda, on NPR today. Sebarenzi was in Canada during the 1994 genocide when he lost his parents, seven siblings and numerous relatives. He returned to Rwanda less than a year later, becoming a leading politician and later speaker of parliament in 1997. He describes his journey in God Sleeps in Rwanda and talks about his fears for his country of birth on NPR,

“If you look at Rwanda today, people live in peace with each other, but underneath, it’s boiling. You cannot have reconciliation if you don’t have justice on both sides,” he says. “We need to come up with a formula that will make Hutu and Tutsi part of the system. That way, we can have a hope to have a lasting peace and reconciliation in Rwanda.” link

Listen to the 6 minute chat on the All Things Considered show on NPR by clicking the audio below,

Photo taken from the kigaliwire on flickr.

One Response to “People live in peace with each other, but underneath, it’s boiling”

  1. […] You that Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families, and former speaker of the Rwandan parliament Joseph Sebarenzi, talked with CNN last week about Rwanda’s development since the 1994 genocide, the upcoming […]